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First-Order Fresnel Lens / Light

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First-Order Fresnel Lens / Light
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First-Order Fresnel Lens / Light
In 1822 a French Physicist named Augustin Fresnel invented a lens that would make his name commonplace along the seacoasts of Europe and North America. It looked like a giant glass beehive, with a light at the center. The lens could be as tall as twelve feet, with concentric rings of glass prisms above and below to bend the light into a narrow beam. At the center the lens was shaped like a magnifying glass, so the concentrated beam was even more powerful.

Tests showed that while an open flame lost nearly 97% of its light, and a flame with reflectors...

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In 1822 a French Physicist named Augustin Fresnel invented a lens that would make his name commonplace along the seacoasts of Europe and North America. It looked like a giant glass beehive, with a light at the center. The lens could be as tall as twelve feet, with concentric rings of glass prisms above and below to bend the light into a narrow beam. At the center the lens was shaped like a magnifying glass, so the concentrated beam was even more powerful.

Tests showed that while an open flame lost nearly 97% of its light, and a flame with reflectors...

Continued from above... flame with reflectors behind it still lost 83% of its light, the Fresnel lens was able to capture all but 17% of its light. Because of its amazing efficiency, a Fresnel lens could easily throw its light 20 or more miles to the horizon.

Seven types, called "orders," of the lens were developed. The first three largest orders were for seacoast lights, while orders four through six were smaller, for harbor or bay lights. There was also a 3.5 order lens which was used mostly in the Great Lakes.

Source: The Fresnel Lens, http://lighthousegetaway.com/lights/fresnel.html




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